costumes rock ever so much

buckysexual:

fuck-me-barnes:

rosycowellmakeup:

I saw Captain America: The Winter Soldier the other day. It was a cool costume.

This was both my first time using my new Mehron paints (which I LOVE) and my first ever attempt at body painting. Turns out painting your own arm is REALLY hard.

Mehron Paradise paints

EDIT: have been getting questions about the clothes - they’re paint, not a costume :)

Mother o’ god this is PERFECT

Holy shit

ikearstin:

yenia251994:

jean grey cosplay fans

Thanks for posting my 90’s #jeangrey #cosplay! For more, please visit www.kearstin.com 💕

detonation-dusk:

God bless the cosplayers who buy full replica costumes. They support costume/prop makers from around the world.

God bless the cosplayers who throw together their costumes from charity shops and old clothes. Your resourcefulness and productivity is to be admired.

God bless the cosplayers who make their costumes from scratch. Your creativity and skill is incredible and inspiring.

God bless cosplayers, for letting us all for just one day be more than who we are.

msjayjustice:

In case anyone was curious, this is the exact photo that someone decided to comment on saying “she needs a push up bra to keep up with other cosplayers” Y’all thought I was kidding when I said that if your breasts aren’t up to your neck it’s not enough for random dudes. Luckily we don’t cosplay for them. I wore this costume because I like Power Girl and my friends tallestsilver and geekeryandhockey goaded me into it lol. Me and my $3.99 regular bra from K-Mart are doing just fine. Lmao

msjayjustice:

In case anyone was curious, this is the exact photo that someone decided to comment on saying “she needs a push up bra to keep up with other cosplayers” Y’all thought I was kidding when I said that if your breasts aren’t up to your neck it’s not enough for random dudes. Luckily we don’t cosplay for them. I wore this costume because I like Power Girl and my friends tallestsilver and geekeryandhockey goaded me into it lol. Me and my $3.99 regular bra from K-Mart are doing just fine. Lmao

zombiesonlywantmeformybrains:

Fire & Ice and the rest of the Justice League International at Megacon 2014

tallythor:

tabzthemighty:

ladys3:

Black Widow (The Avengers) | DragonCon 2012

These are older, but I was going through them looking for something, and I forgot just how beautiful Bryan Humphrey’s work is. I just felt like sharing it and my wonderful Avengers whom I love and miss so much!

And for an added bonus, here’s the full Avengers group (minus moonflowerlights as Hill) from DragonCon 2013:

image

Can we talk about how gorgeous my Widow is?


….that Thor ain’t bad either.

Eh, I’m not so sure about the Thor. Any woman who marries that guy has gotta be nuts! :P

thecosplayinitiative:

Ravager cosplay by Megan Coffey
Photo by Chasis Photos
Don’t forget we need your cosplay! Send us your work! or find us at Facebook / Twittter / Tumblr

thecosplayinitiative:

Ravager cosplay by Megan Coffey

Photo by Chasis Photos

Don’t forget we need your cosplay! Send us your work! or find us at Facebook / Twittter / Tumblr

bellechere:

What’s this smouldering collection of uber talented people? It’s the cast for an upcoming project called A Night in New Orleans, organized by CosCouture!

We’re looking to answer the question ‘What would Marvel characters do on a night off in New Orleans?’ If you know me, you know I’ve always wanted to visit NOLA, and this project would be bringing me down to portray my favorite character, Rogue, to boot! I’ll be in the company of these 13 other great costumers and 3 photographers, and we’d be staying in the French Quarter, everyday photographing some pretty epic ideas at recognizable NOLA locations, all culminating into an epic battle (of course!). The end result will be a calendar that will be sold for charity (100% of profits to Geeks Empowering Extraordinary Kids) and a coffeetable photo book.

Course, it can’t happen without proper funding. Right now we’re struggling on just getting the word out there and need all the help we can get. Please check out the Kickstarter, and if you can’t donate (even $1 would help!) then please share this around.

This would be a dream come true for me. If you’ve ever appreciated my costuming, please help out with this. Thank you! :)

tallythor:

orbakat:

Marvel Comics - Black Widow

Cosplayer: Orbakat
Photography: Foxfoo

So beautiful!!! Everything about these is wonderful.

potassiumcyanide:

samaelcarver:

wattthefisk:

Amazing cosplays!

Our bad-assed collection of amazing cosplays!

….HOLD THE FUCK UP!!!!

Is that first one an Assassins Creed version of Captain Jack Sparrow?????

Holy shit these are awesome

decodethefallenmoon:

wafflesforstephanie:

geth-metal:

frostbackscat:

Oh my god if you’re going to judge someone’s cosplay you better learn your fucking shit because this is Duela Dent you goddamn assholes.


AHAHAHA
Perpetually laughing over the fact that “real gamer/comic book nerd” males keep insulting women for cosplaying things they’ve never even heard of 
who’s the “fake geek” now, fuckers? 

Make it viral

WOULD YOU LIKE SOME ICE FOR THAT BURN MEME-MAKER


Judgy McJudgerson over there…. Sheesh.

decodethefallenmoon:

wafflesforstephanie:

geth-metal:

frostbackscat:

Oh my god if you’re going to judge someone’s cosplay you better learn your fucking shit because this is Duela Dent you goddamn assholes.

AHAHAHA

Perpetually laughing over the fact that “real gamer/comic book nerd” males keep insulting women for cosplaying things they’ve never even heard of 

who’s the “fake geek” now, fuckers? 

Make it viral

WOULD YOU LIKE SOME ICE FOR THAT BURN MEME-MAKER

Judgy McJudgerson over there…. Sheesh.

thatdjspider:

#TipTuesday  Commissions PART THE FIRST If you’re not handy with a sewing machine, can’t style your own hair, much less a wig, or couldn’t paint yourself out of a paper bag, but you want to cosplay, chances are you’re going to look into getting a costume commissioned. THERE IS NOTHING WRONG WITH THIS. It doesn’t make you any less of a cosplayer because you didn’t make it yourself, and anyone who tells you this needs to be smacked with a wet spinach noodle. ‘Nuff said. Many people offer their services for commissions, but if it’s your first time, I wanted to offer some guidelines and tips to help you have the best experience possible. BEGINNING: * Do your research. Before you think about sending money to someone, make sure you’ve seen their work, or are able to get some feedback from others who have worked with them. Many costuming forums have sections where people have posted reviews – good and bad – about their experiences. Do a Google search for the business and see what pops up, as someone may have just limited it to a blog post. If someone you know has used them, ask for details. Don’t hand your money over to someone you haven’t vetted. * Be sure you give yourself enough time. Most people are booked 4-8 weeks out, so if you need a Mini-Mjolnir in your hands in 2 days, chances are good it’s not going to happen.  * When you reach out to the person, start by asking if they are currently accepting commissions, and if so, when the next available slot is. Many people do commissions in addition to maintaining a real life – jobs, kids, pets, social commitments – so they may not be able to work with you on the timetable that you need. Be respectful of this.REQUEST: If they are accepting commissions, follow up with all of the details so you can get an accurate quote:  * Character name and pictures - “I want a Wasp costume” is terrible. Janet Van Dyne changed her costume as often as she changed your shampoo, so be sure you provide some pictures that show what you want, the more the better. Ditto for prop and wig commissions. * Date you need it by - “by AmazingBigCon” isn’t really specific – you’ll want it in advance of the event, so give a firm date. * Exceptions – Are you allergic to any materials? Do you have a height limit when it comes to heels? Do you need to be able to take it on a plane? Will you be wearing it just for a shoot, or all day at a convention? Did you want it sleeveless, or do you need to take into account something that’s specific to you (must have place for phone/keycard/insulin/etc)…all of these things are better to for the commissioner to know up front, so they can factor it into the design. You may have some back and forth so you are both sure of all the details, which is totally cool. You also might be told that this is beyond their skill level, or that they just aren’t interested in doing the costume. Don’t get crankypants about it – the best costumes come when both of you are on the same page, so just keep looking. Did you really want a badly constructed costume, or something someone didn’t want to make? You might also ask if they have someone they can refer you to.THE QUOTE: Quotes are tricky things, from both sides of the fence. You want a costume that is cost-effective, so you have more money to spend at the Con, but the person making the costume has to account for the effort on their end. It’s absolutely OK to have a budget in mind, but realize that you aren’t getting a complete Elsa costume for $40. Here’s how it will probably break down: * Materials: Usually something will need to be ordered – a base wig, fabric in a specific color, paint, glue, etc. The commissioner will have to sit down and work all of this out. * Labor: How long is going to take to make? There’s usually an average hourly rate that has to be accounted for. Would you work for free, or take a paycheck that was half of what you expected because they cut your salary? * Shipping: If you’re not working with someone in your area, chances are it will need to be shipped to you. Be sure you know how that will happen, if tracking or expedited mail is provided, etc. When you get the quote, be sure they outline what exactly what they’re doing for you: “one black spandex catsuit with front zipper, yellow nylon belt with attached ammo pouches, latex eye mask; shipping included, to arrive on or before [date]” is a good example. Does the quote you get look ridiculously expensive? Feel free to look around for someone else, but also take into consideration what you’re getting – a custom piece designed specifically for you, your measurements or design. These people aren’t big-biz, able to cut costs because they can buy in bulk because they are mass-producing items. They shop just like you, and usually buy only what they need to complete a costume, and they are at the mercy of shipping times as well. You may have room to negotiate - maybe you really only want the catsuit, and you’ll get a custom belt next time to match. Perhaps you don’t need the costume to be make out of real leather - maybe it’s more cost effective to use pleather or vinyl. Just respond quickly, as they may be holding a spot for you until you decide, or negotiating a schedule with several people, so your delay will impact others. If you decide to look else where, politely thank the person and move on. ——NEXT WEEK! Commissions, Part the Second! I’ll talk about what to expect during and after! And feel free to chime in with your own thoughts and experiences on the beginning of the commission process, from either side of the fence!

thatdjspider:

#TipTuesday Commissions PART THE FIRST

If you’re not handy with a sewing machine, can’t style your own hair, much less a wig, or couldn’t paint yourself out of a paper bag, but you want to cosplay, chances are you’re going to look into getting a costume commissioned. THERE IS NOTHING WRONG WITH THIS. It doesn’t make you any less of a cosplayer because you didn’t make it yourself, and anyone who tells you this needs to be smacked with a wet spinach noodle. ‘Nuff said.

Many people offer their services for commissions, but if it’s your first time, I wanted to offer some guidelines and tips to help you have the best experience possible.

BEGINNING:
* Do your research. Before you think about sending money to someone, make sure you’ve seen their work, or are able to get some feedback from others who have worked with them. Many costuming forums have sections where people have posted reviews – good and bad – about their experiences. Do a Google search for the business and see what pops up, as someone may have just limited it to a blog post. If someone you know has used them, ask for details. Don’t hand your money over to someone you haven’t vetted.

* Be sure you give yourself enough time. Most people are booked 4-8 weeks out, so if you need a Mini-Mjolnir in your hands in 2 days, chances are good it’s not going to happen.

* When you reach out to the person, start by asking if they are currently accepting commissions, and if so, when the next available slot is. Many people do commissions in addition to maintaining a real life – jobs, kids, pets, social commitments – so they may not be able to work with you on the timetable that you need. Be respectful of this.

REQUEST:
If they are accepting commissions, follow up with all of the details so you can get an accurate quote:

* Character name and pictures - “I want a Wasp costume” is terrible. Janet Van Dyne changed her costume as often as she changed your shampoo, so be sure you provide some pictures that show what you want, the more the better. Ditto for prop and wig commissions.

* Date you need it by - “by AmazingBigCon” isn’t really specific – you’ll want it in advance of the event, so give a firm date.

* Exceptions – Are you allergic to any materials? Do you have a height limit when it comes to heels? Do you need to be able to take it on a plane? Will you be wearing it just for a shoot, or all day at a convention? Did you want it sleeveless, or do you need to take into account something that’s specific to you (must have place for phone/keycard/insulin/etc)…all of these things are better to for the commissioner to know up front, so they can factor it into the design.

You may have some back and forth so you are both sure of all the details, which is totally cool. You also might be told that this is beyond their skill level, or that they just aren’t interested in doing the costume. Don’t get crankypants about it – the best costumes come when both of you are on the same page, so just keep looking. Did you really want a badly constructed costume, or something someone didn’t want to make? You might also ask if they have someone they can refer you to.

THE QUOTE:
Quotes are tricky things, from both sides of the fence. You want a costume that is cost-effective, so you have more money to spend at the Con, but the person making the costume has to account for the effort on their end. It’s absolutely OK to have a budget in mind, but realize that you aren’t getting a complete Elsa costume for $40. Here’s how it will probably break down:
* Materials: Usually something will need to be ordered – a base wig, fabric in a specific color, paint, glue, etc. The commissioner will have to sit down and work all of this out.
* Labor: How long is going to take to make? There’s usually an average hourly rate that has to be accounted for. Would you work for free, or take a paycheck that was half of what you expected because they cut your salary?
* Shipping: If you’re not working with someone in your area, chances are it will need to be shipped to you. Be sure you know how that will happen, if tracking or expedited mail is provided, etc.

When you get the quote, be sure they outline what exactly what they’re doing for you: “one black spandex catsuit with front zipper, yellow nylon belt with attached ammo pouches, latex eye mask; shipping included, to arrive on or before [date]” is a good example.

Does the quote you get look ridiculously expensive? Feel free to look around for someone else, but also take into consideration what you’re getting – a custom piece designed specifically for you, your measurements or design. These people aren’t big-biz, able to cut costs because they can buy in bulk because they are mass-producing items. They shop just like you, and usually buy only what they need to complete a costume, and they are at the mercy of shipping times as well.

You may have room to negotiate - maybe you really only want the catsuit, and you’ll get a custom belt next time to match. Perhaps you don’t need the costume to be make out of real leather - maybe it’s more cost effective to use pleather or vinyl. Just respond quickly, as they may be holding a spot for you until you decide, or negotiating a schedule with several people, so your delay will impact others.

If you decide to look else where, politely thank the person and move on.

——

NEXT WEEK! Commissions, Part the Second! I’ll talk about what to expect during and after!

And feel free to chime in with your own thoughts and experiences on the beginning of the commission process, from either side of the fence!

asuna-san15:

@yayahan quote. I look up to her sooooo much, she is my inspiration not only in cosplay but in life too. She has such a good outlook. Thank you, Yaya. :) <3

asuna-san15:

@yayahan quote. I look up to her sooooo much, she is my inspiration not only in cosplay but in life too. She has such a good outlook. Thank you, Yaya. :) <3

johannaost:

Another of my past Halloween costumes, Vampira.